May 18, 2022

Eric Clapton: Vaccine-Hating, Trump Supporter

There’s a lot of misinformation circulating around the internet about how vaccines are harmful to human health. And now that science is proving these claims false, it seems like people are getting even more creative with their conspiracy theories. Take Eric Clapton for example, who has been funding anti-vaccine research through his charitable organization since 2005.

Now Clapton is sticking to his stand that vaccinations are harmful, and has compared those who receive them as “slave owners” for children.

Clapton recently said, The vaccinations have damaged many people. It’s obvious that it can damage children. All you have to do is look at the medical history of the vaccinations and you will see for yourself.

People are also dying from vaccinations. They have paid money for something that has damaged their children. It’s a crime, but it’s hidden. If you can inject whooping cough and measles into an infant, why do we have these diseases at all? The argument is that the body needs to experience these things in order to be healthy, but it’s also interesting that people die from these illnesses after having the vaccinations. It’s a slave-owner mentality – ‘you will do what I tell you to do.’ If we didn’t have so many injections all cancers would drop down practically to nothing.

This statement was brought up by a fan who recently attended Clapton’s concert in London, where the musician has been playing since November.

This isn’t an isolated incident either. It seems like Clapton feels very strongly about this subject, and he wanted to share his viewpoints with the fans who support him by purchasing tickets for his shows. And because of this, it seems like Clapton’s views on vaccinations and science in general might be evolving into a new conspiracy theory.

Clapton has spent over $2 million funding the research of British physician Andrew Wakefield, who first published his study about MMR causing autism back in 1998. Later on, it was found that Wakefield’s study was fraudulent and he had deceived his colleagues with fake data.

Although this was the case, it didn’t stop celebrities like Clapton from continuing to support Wakefield and fund further studies into vaccinations causing autism. And in 2014, when it came out that Wakefield committed fraud and faked the whole thing, the anti-vaccination movement only grew bigger.

Wakefield said, The medical profession is so threatened by the fact that their long held dogma has come under question, they will resort to anything to discredit the data.

However, this isn’t an isolated incident of celebrities speaking out against vaccines and its ingredients. Rapper legend Ice Cube recently came out in support of Dr. Wakefield’s research, saying that vaccinations are linked to autism and that the scientists lied about the MMR study back in 2004.

There’s even Jenny McCarthy, an American actress and model who is known for her opposition towards vaccination despite not being a medical professional herself. This lead to ABC cancelling her talk show back in 2013 after she refused to provide medical evidence for her claims.

Despite the fact that there is no scientific proof or data to suggest that vaccinations are linked to autism, many people continue to stick by this conspiracy theory. And now with celebrities coming out against vaccinations, it seems like this movement will only grow bigger until someone takes the issue seriously.

More people are choosing not to vaccinate their children, thus putting the lives of other children in danger who can’t be vaccinated for illnesses like polio or measles because they’re too young. This is also becoming a problem with adults who cannot receive vaccines anymore, and there’s even some new cases of parents claiming religious exemptions from vaccinations.

In the case of Clapton, it’s unclear whether or not he’s still actively funding research into Wakefield’s fake study. However, his statements against vaccinations are very concerning given how many children suffer not just in America but across the world because of this conspiracy theory that refuses to go away.