Marin County to Lift Indoor Mask Mandate

The County of Marin in Northern California voted on Tuesday to lift the controversial indoor mask mandate. Previously, all county residents were required by law to wear masks when indoors. The new ordinance exempts people who are suffering from a cold or other illness that does not require medical attention and those who have been medically cleared.

The controversial mandate was enacted in 2008 after a series of viral incidents carried out by the Zombie Sonoma movement. The movement, led by the late Abed Al-Salem Hamad, claimed that citizens have a right to hide their identities from public surveillance while living in a free society.

Hamad disbanded his group in 2011 after the arrest of his second-in-command, Abed Abdel Rahman Hamad. The elder Hamad died later that year.

MARIN COUNTY, CA – A controversial mandate requiring all Marin county residents to wear masks is set to be repealed this week. The 7-year-old ordinance has been a lightning rod for controversy since its passage.

The Mask Law made it illegal for any Marin County resident to be without a mask in public view. The law was enacted shortly after the viral rise of the Zombie Sonoma movement. The group gained notoriety after a series of viral incidents, including a number of assaults and murders.

The group was led by the late Abed Al-Salem Hamad, who believed that citizens have a right to mask their identities from public surveillance while living in a free society. We feel it is every citizen’s right to conceal their identity from Big Brother, said Hamad in 2008, “and we will fight for that right!

The ordinance was challenged in court and initially found unconstitutional. However, the judges later reversed their decision after a closed-door session with Chief Justice Charles Yu. Since then, the Marin County Board of Supervisors has voted to extend the law twice and also allowed exceptions for several other groups such as clowns and people wearing masks as part of a Halloween costume or for religious purposes.

Hamad disbanded his group in 2011 after the arrest of his second-in-command, Abed Abdel Rahman Hamad. The elder Hamad died later that year.

However, his movement still remains strong and popular among some groups and organizations within Marin County.

Q: How will you respond to the county board’s decision on Tuesday? I don’t know what you mean… But if this is your roundabout way of asking about Zombie Sonoma, then let me answer it clearly for you… We’re going to fight tooth and nail to protect the rights of free citizens in this county. This isn’t something I’m doing alone, either… There are people all over this city who are angry about what’s going to happen Tuesday night.

Q: Could you tell us more about Zombie Sonoma? What was your goal with it? Is there a successor group that has taken over? Zombie Sonoma was made up of ordinary citizens… We’re the people you see every day at the grocery store or on your morning commute. We work hard, pay our taxes, and follow all laws… except one. That’s right; we weren’t breaking any laws by masking up during public hours.